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mocatv:

Based in La Paz, artist collective Mujeres Creando employ a variety of tactics and media to engage the public in their feminist movement.

For more than two decades, the collective have promoted solidarity through zines, public performance, protests, and events hosted at their café. In this video, the group spreads their message on their pirate station Radio Deseo, and by tagging bold, topical questions and aphorisms on the streets of the city, ensuring maximum visibility of their speech.

Though Mujeres Creando combat patriarchal norms at large in Latin America, their work is particularly important in Bolivia, where a federal government lurching toward progress does little to combat the day-to-day violence and injustice against women in local penal systems.

Global Street Art - Mujeres Creando - Art in the Streets - MOCAtv

(via sexlessnosex)

Support Monica Jones and De-fund Project ROSE →

Organising for AFem2014: an anarcha-feminist conference in London on Sunday October 19th 2014 →

Organising for AFem2014: an anarcha-feminist conference in London on Sunday October 19th 2014

www.afed.org.uk

The Anarchist Federation is a UK based organisation of class struggle anarchists working for a revolutionary change to destroy capitalism and create a free and equal anarchist communist society.

Do you know about Luisa Capetillo, born in 1879, in Arecibo, Puerto Rico?

“When there is no longer the need to steal a roll of bread, for lack of food; when private property no longer exists and we all begin to view each other as brothers and sisters, then and only then will the prisons and useless, destructive churches disappear. Misery, hate and prostitution will cease to exist. Free trade will exist because all frontiers and borders will be abolished and then true liberty will reign on this planet” – Luisa Capetillo


You can read about her too:

anarcha library: Luisa Capetillo: Art/Agitation/Anarchy!

anarcha library: Luisa Capetillo: A Literary Introduction to Anarcha-Feminism (2012)

anarcha library: Badass Ladies of History: Luisa Capetillo (2011)

ebookcollective:

Andrea Smith, Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide (2005)

.PDF
.PDF (alternative)
In Conquest, Smith places Native American women at the center of her analysis of sexual violence, challenging both conventional definitions of the term and conventional responses to the problem.
Beginning with the impact of the abuses inflicted on Native American children at state-sanctioned boarding schools from the 1880s to the 1980s, Smith adroitly expands our conception of violence to include environmental racism, population control and the widespread appropriation of Indian cultural practices by whites and other non-natives. Smith deftly connects these and other examples of historical and contemporary colonialism to the high rates of violence against Native American women—the most likely women in the United States to die of poverty-related illnesses, be victims of rape and suffer partner abuse.
Essential reading for scholars and activists, Conquest is the powerful synthesis of Andrea Smith’s intellectual and political work to date. By focusing on the impact of sexual violence on Native American women, Smith articulates an agenda that is compelling to feminists, Native Americans, other people of color and all who are committed to creating viable alternatives to state-based “solutions.”

ebookcollective:

Andrea Smith, Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide (2005)

.PDF

.PDF (alternative)

In Conquest, Smith places Native American women at the center of her analysis of sexual violence, challenging both conventional definitions of the term and conventional responses to the problem.

Beginning with the impact of the abuses inflicted on Native American children at state-sanctioned boarding schools from the 1880s to the 1980s, Smith adroitly expands our conception of violence to include environmental racism, population control and the widespread appropriation of Indian cultural practices by whites and other non-natives. Smith deftly connects these and other examples of historical and contemporary colonialism to the high rates of violence against Native American women—the most likely women in the United States to die of poverty-related illnesses, be victims of rape and suffer partner abuse.

Essential reading for scholars and activists, Conquest is the powerful synthesis of Andrea Smith’s intellectual and political work to date. By focusing on the impact of sexual violence on Native American women, Smith articulates an agenda that is compelling to feminists, Native Americans, other people of color and all who are committed to creating viable alternatives to state-based “solutions.”

Sorry for the hiatus on http://anarchalibrary.blogspot.com.  You can look forward to a few additions in the next few weeks, and hopefully i can find some new things.  As always, let me know if you know of something that should be added.  Thanks.

Spring/Summer Additions to the site

these are the items that have been added since the last “additions” update in February.  posting has slowed down a bit, but i’m trying to pick it back up.  most of these are from this year or last year, since i haven’t been digging through archives much.  enjoy.

Espertirina Martins (2013)

Mett, Ida, 1901-1973

Women’s subversive individualism in Barcelona during the 1930s (1992)

Coletiva Anarcafeminista Marana (2012)

Radical refusals: On the anarchist politics of women choosing asexuality (2010)

The Problem with “Privilege” (2013)

What if safe spaces were violent to us? (2011)

Safety is an Illusion - Glamorized violence, nihilism and their inherent patriarchal repercussions: a critical response (2013)

Indigenous Women: Never Idle (2013)

An anarcha-feminists’ subjective perspective of anarcha-feminism (1992)

Hateful Sophistry: The Misguided Transphobia of Deep Green Resistance (2013)

Anarcha-feminism and anarcho-machismo in Spain (2013)

On the RAG - Interview with Revolutionary Anarcha- Feminist Group (2013)

Accounting for Ourselves (2013)

She’s just not that into you (2012)

Anarchism/Feminism (1970)

Peggy Plews: Prison Abolitionist (2013)

Pro-State Definitely Does Not Mean Pro-Freedom: A Very Late Response to Meghan Murphy (2013)

Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries: Survival, Revolt, and Queer Antagonist Struggle

Queens, Hookers, and Hustlers: Organizing for Survival and Revolt Amongst Gender-Variant Sex Workers, 1950-1970

queering heterosexuality (2012)

Insurrections at the Intersections: Feminism, Intersectionality and Anarchism (2012)

Betrayal - a critical analysis of rape culture in anarchist subcultures (2012)

Polyamory as a Reserve Army of Care Labor (2013)

Polyamory and Queer Anarchism: Infinite Possibilities for Resistance (2012)

There’s no such thing as free choice, so why single out sex workers? (2012)

Anarcha-Feminism and the Newer “Woman Question” (2012)

Sexual Violence and the Greek Left (2013)

The Source of the Nile: A Search for the Origins of Male Domination (1988)

Terrains of Protest: Striking City Women (1988)

what’s the best piece (pamphlet/zine or otherwise) on consent?

Independent Project: Mujeres Libres from Daniela Sanchez on Vimeo.

Resources:
Ackelsberg, Martha “Free Women of Spain: Anarchism and the Struggle for the Emancipation of Women.” Bloomington: Indiana UP. 1991.
Crespo Folguera, Pilar, Margarita Ortega López, and Cristina Segura Graiño. “Historia de las Mujeres en España.” et: Elisa Garrido Gónzalez. Madrid: Editorial Síntesis, 1997.
Casanova, Julian. “Anarchism, the Republic, and Civil War in Spain: 1931-1939.” New York: Taylor & Francis Books, 2004.
Mangini, Shirley “Memories of Resistance: Women’s Voices from the Spanish Civil War.” New Haven: Yale University, 1995.


Videos:
De Toda la Vida. available on youtube
The Spanish Civil War: Inside the Revolution. available on youtube
The Spanish Civil War: Prelude to Tragedy. available on youtube
Indomables, Una Historia de Mujeres Libres (Trailer). available on youtube.
Libertarias. available on youtube

Songs:
¡No Pasarán!
Mujeres Libres Anthem
Anthem of the Second Spanish Republic.

Independent Project: Mujeres Libres on Vimeo - http://vimeo.com/41402113